• The GiftBot 2.0 Launch Giveaway Extravaganza has come to a close with an astounding 8073 games given away to the community by 696 members, a huge success thanks to you! The gifting now continues with more official prizes in the new Gaming Giveaways |OT|. Leftover Steam codes are also being given away to the PC Gaming Era community.

Wkd Box Office - 11•1-3•19 - Producer James Cameron Returns....With His Second Bomb Of 2019

Status
Not open for further replies.

El Bombastico

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
10,577
Did anyone even WANT a new Charlie's Angels film? I just watched the 2000 films a couple weeks ago and goddamn, they (and the entire concept in general) have not aged well.
 
Oct 25, 2017
13,229
I am curious to see how Little Women does this Christmas. I think it will be a more effective counter-programming to Star Wars than Cats for obvious reasons.
 

Salty Catfish

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
1,385
Florida
It takes some skill to fuck up making money on a horror movie in 2019. Bummer, like most other folks here I've heard nothing but good things about it too.
I am curious to see how Little Women does this Christmas. I think it will be a more effective counter-programming to Star Wars than Cats for obvious reasons.
It's going to be a monster hit. Star power, Lady Bird is beloved, perfect counter-programming to Star Wars.
 

Chaos Legion

Member
Oct 30, 2017
3,533
I love Little Women. I love this adaptation and cast.

But it's not going to breakout, I feel. Downton Abbey is proably its ceiling (but should get an award bump?)
 

Salty Catfish

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
1,385
Florida
I think one of the main problems is the studios misjudging just how beloved by the general audience those specific franchises actually are.
Absolutely. Or at least, beloved enough for people to put their butts in a seat. The Shining is a classic but there is close to zero mainstream nostalgia factor there, which is usually the primary motivator for these type of franchise resurrections.
 

Chaos Legion

Member
Oct 30, 2017
3,533
But what does the public want outside of comic book films?

I can understand how MIB (comic) and Charlie's Angels could lend themselves to be blockbusters. But how the fuck do people want Jumanji?

Paramount and Sony are scrambling. Universal seems content to just roll the dice? Probably why they're my favorite studio at the moment.
 

Chaos Legion

Member
Oct 30, 2017
3,533
That is a breakout. Downton Abbey made loads. You don't need to be 500+ million with these type of films, they don't cost 175 million to make.
You're right. I think it'll be profitable for sure, but I meant I thought the gross would be similar to Downton. Universal spent like $10mm though for that movie's budget; with the Little Women cast, I feel like Sony had to have spent way more (probably, as usual, I could be wrong!)

I think of the two, A Beautiful Day is gonna be Sony's breakout over Little Women (I'll watch both and cry)
 

Donald Draper

Member
Feb 2, 2019
2,092
Did anyone even WANT a new Charlie's Angels film? I just watched the 2000 films a couple weeks ago and goddamn, they (and the entire concept in general) have not aged well.
Those movies were terrible so they already killed off whatever nostalgia there was for the original and nobody has nostalgia for those films.

You can smell the bomb as soon as it was announced.
 

Donald Draper

Member
Feb 2, 2019
2,092
But what does the public want outside of comic book films?

I can understand how MIB (comic) and Charlie's Angels could lend themselves to be blockbusters. But how the fuck do people want Jumanji?

Paramount and Sony are scrambling. Universal seems content to just roll the dice? Probably why they're my favorite studio at the moment.
How about letting new,interesting upcoming directors keep making original films instead of pushing them immediately into blockbusters after they make 1 film. Of course the directors could say no, like Peele did.
 

El Bombastico

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
10,577
But what does the public want outside of comic book films?

I can understand how MIB (comic) and Charlie's Angels could lend themselves to be blockbusters. But how the fuck do people want Jumanji?

Paramount and Sony are scrambling. Universal seems content to just roll the dice? Probably why they're my favorite studio at the moment.
People want good films, or perhaps rather, competently made films that don't have glaring pacing, script, or acting issues. The age where Hollywood can force crap after crap onto the audience and have at the least the OW do decently before WoM sinks it are gone. Jumanji did well because of great WoM from both critics and social media. With movie tickets being as ridiculous as they are now, people want to make sure they're getting their money's worth
 

Chaos Legion

Member
Oct 30, 2017
3,533
Sony rebooting Jumanji and it a) actually being good and b) somehow making a billion is one of the weirdest Hollywood developments in the past few years.
It's weirdly humbling for them with MIB flopping. Lightning legitimately struck. But the next one is projected to come in around $300mm domestically and won't be Sony's top earner domestically, but that is still hugely impressive.

How about letting new,interesting upcoming directors keep making original films instead of pushing them immediately into blockbusters after they make 1 film. Of course the directors could say no, like Peele did.
I was wondering about this. Is there a benchmark to track this? I'd be curious to see which studio is the best at this
 

Sibersk Esto

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,988
People will come to movies with interesting hooks that are clearly advertised in the marketing. Sometimes, that hook is "come watch a movie about The Joker, a character you all know" but that's enough.

"The sequel to a 30+ year old film" is not a good hook.
 

Anung

Member
Oct 25, 2017
4,289
People will come to movies with interesting hooks that are clearly advertised in the marketing. Sometimes, that hook is "come watch a movie about The Joker, a character you all know" but that's enough.

"The sequel to a 30+ year old film" is not a good hook.
"Hey remember that good film? well here's the same film but worse."
 

CesareNorrez

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,365
How about letting new,interesting upcoming directors keep making original films instead of pushing them immediately into blockbusters after they make 1 film. Of course the directors could say no, like Peele did.
Pretty much every up and coming director, that has received any amount of good publicity, has been approached by a studio to make a “blockbuster”.

Robert Eggers said that when The Witch was shown at a festival and was well received he was quickly contacted by a studio about a superhero movie. He said it was off putting because he knew there was no way they had even seen his film.

But I understand why it’s hard to resist because they are offering a relatively ton of money and a potential career. Too bad it ends in a creative rash heap for many of them.
 

Schlorgan

Member
Oct 25, 2017
5,807
Bountiful, Utah
People will come to movies with interesting hooks that are clearly advertised in the marketing. Sometimes, that hook is "come watch a movie about The Joker, a character you all know" but that's enough.

"The sequel to a 30+ year old film" is not a good hook.
More specifically, "the sequel to a 30+ year old film that the general audience doesn't really care about" isn't a good hook.
 

El Bombastico

Avenger
Oct 25, 2017
10,577
It's weirdly humbling for them with MIB flopping. Lightning legitimately struck. But the next one is projected to come in around $300mm domestically and won't be Sony's top earner domestically, but that is still hugely impressive.


I was wondering about this. Is there a benchmark to track this? I'd be curious to see which studio is the best at this
Studios push out up and coming directors with big franchises because they're afraid that if they don't, some other studio will gobble them up first and do the same thing. They're basically doing what every other big company does when it finds new talent, hedging their bets and hiring them first before the competition does, not realizing (or caring, it seems) just how big a difference it is from directing a small, passion-project indie-film to a $200+ million blockbuster.

"The sequel to a 30+ year old film" is not a good hook.
Sometimes it is IF the nostalgia is big enough. Jurassic World, for example.
 

kurahador

Member
Oct 28, 2017
4,418
I think one of the main problems is the studios misjudging just how beloved by the general audience those specific franchises actually are.
More like 80's fans died. We're 90's nostalgia now.
Sometimes it is IF the nostalgia is big enough. Jurassic World, for example.
I don't think JW success was due to nostalgia, but more like the subject itself ---- dinosaur. Dino in pop culture is still strong apparently.
 

Ithil

Member
Oct 25, 2017
13,426
Studios push out up and coming directors with big franchises because they're afraid that if they don't, some other studio will gobble them up first and do the same thing. They're basically doing what every other big company does when it finds new talent, hedging their bets and hiring them first before the competition does, not realizing (or caring, it seems) just how big a difference it is from directing a small, passion-project indie-film to a $200+ million blockbuster.



Sometimes it is IF the nostalgia is big enough. Jurassic World, for example.
Jurassic Park was 22 years old at that time (with two sequels), exactly the right time for young people who saw it then as kids to be ready for a revival, as well as a big blockbuster bringing in new people.
And JP1 was one of the biggest films of all time anyway, The Shining is iconic but not like that. It's not as though JP only had pop cultural relevance in the 90s.

There's a sweet spot of both timing and relevance to hit and they missed it with this one.
 

THEVOID

Member
Oct 27, 2017
9,293
Studios push out up and coming directors with big franchises because they're afraid that if they don't, some other studio will gobble them up first and do the same thing. They're basically doing what every other big company does when it finds new talent, hedging their bets and hiring them first before the competition does, not realizing (or caring, it seems) just how big a difference it is from directing a small, passion-project indie-film to a $200+ million blockbuster.
Studios do that because the filmmakers are cheap and controllable. They come a dime a dozen. Their is no competition for their services.
 

2Bee

or not 2B
Moderator
Oct 27, 2017
6,224
So my main take away from Terminator Dark Fate today is that it would have been a fine Terminator 3, if no other Terminator movie had come out since T2.

At this point I think I'm just tired of them remaking the same concept.

The action scenes were fun at least, movie did not feel offensively boring and bad like Genisys.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.