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ParentERA |OT| What To Expect When You’re Not Sleeping

GiJose

Member
Oct 25, 2017
134
Thanks. I was under the impression that it was caused by the fever temperature spiking fast, and not because of the inflammation. I was very worried about his fever last night because he was hovering around 39C and looked pretty out of it in the hour or so before the meds kicked in. But once they kicked in, his temperature went back to normal really quickly.

His temperature stayed down overnight and he seems to be at a stable temperature today without needing advil or Tylenol. Hopefully this means the worst of it is over and the antibiotics are working.

Fingers crossed.
it's caused by the spike in inflammation. fevers (often high) usually come along with that, but you can have a low temp, or even spike a fever after the seizure occurs [this is probably TMI]

fevers will often make kiddos look and feel miserable, so it's good to try to make them more comfortable and bring it down

sorry you went through that, I can't even imagine how scary it is to see your child have a seizure
 

Simon Belmont

Member
Oct 25, 2017
920
Hey guys,

I'm a first time poster in this thread, I think I'm just looking for some perspective, but I'm pretty angry about something that has happened with my son.

So yesterday at his after school program, he burned his thumb (pretty badly, blister covering pretty much the entire pad of his dominant hand) on the end of a hot glue gun that he was apparently using during said program. For context he's going to be six at the end of December. Personally I cannot for the life of me imagine why one would hand a hot glue gun to a child that young, but after speaking with the program coordinator she did not seem at all freaked out by this.

So Era, would any of you folks expect that your child would be playing with a hot glue gun at that age? Am I out to lunch here?
 

Chopchop

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,423
it's caused by the spike in inflammation. fevers (often high) usually come along with that, but you can have a low temp, or even spike a fever after the seizure occurs [this is probably TMI]

fevers will often make kiddos look and feel miserable, so it's good to try to make them more comfortable and bring it down

sorry you went through that, I can't even imagine how scary it is to see your child have a seizure
It's okay, that's not TMI. It's helpful to know more about these things anyway.

Kid was much better today. Fever was gone entirely, though he still needed Advil and Tylenol to manage the pain from his ears. He was crying inconsolably whenever the pain came back.

We have a follow-up with the hospital tomorrow, but at least it seems the worst of it is over. I'm still pretty high strung from the whole thing, and don't know when I'll be able to relax around him again. Probably not until he's at least over this sickness entirely.

Hey guys,

I'm a first time poster in this thread, I think I'm just looking for some perspective, but I'm pretty angry about something that has happened with my son.

So yesterday at his after school program, he burned his thumb (pretty badly, blister covering pretty much the entire pad of his dominant hand) on the end of a hot glue gun that he was apparently using during said program. For context he's going to be six at the end of December. Personally I cannot for the life of me imagine why one would hand a hot glue gun to a child that young, but after speaking with the program coordinator she did not seem at all freaked out by this.

So Era, would any of you folks expect that your child would be playing with a hot glue gun at that age? Am I out to lunch here?
A glue gun at six? I think that's messed up. I don't think I was allowed anywhere near those things in elementary school. Crafting tasks involving potentially dangerous tools like that were always done by the teacher.

That was decades ago, though. I dunno what's the norm for schools these days, but that does sound wrong to me. If a place told me that they let kids use glue guns at that age, I wouldn't put my kid with them.
 

Nephtes

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,440
Just got a letter from daycare we have to sign acknowledging we read it stating that the daycare left a 4 year old in a hot bus in September of this year and didn’t realize the child was missing till her father showed up to retrieve her from daycare ... and that apparently the letter was mandated by law and 52 children have died this year in similar instances nationwide this year...
Doesn’t even mention if anyone was disciplined or fired...

WTF...
Like what am I supposed to do with this information except be even more of a nervous wreck?
The fact that it’s a state requirement they sent the letter concerns me that other daycares are not any better...
 
Oct 26, 2017
814
I just wanted to share a product that I found to be awesome. The Hatch Rest. It's like a programmable night light / sound machine. We were having a problem with our nearly two year old son waking up too early, like 4 or 5 am and just crying and crying. My theory was he doesn't have a clock like us, so he can't check it and know it's not time to get up yet. I mean, it's just as dark at 6 as it is at 4 so how would he know when it's morning? We have the Rest set to be blue during the night and at 6:30am it turns yellow which means it's OK to get up. It took him about a month or so to understand. We started setting it to 5:30 or 6ish at first. But eventually he got it and would wait until it turned yellow to start making noise. We just bumped it straight from 6:00 to 6:30 last week and he's been totally fine sleeping until then. Recently he's been sleeping past it turning yellow which gives us time to actually get things done in the morning. It's a little pricey, but it was worth it for us.

Just got a letter from daycare we have to sign acknowledging we read it stating that the daycare left a 4 year old in a hot bus in September of this year and didn’t realize the child was missing till her father showed up to retrieve her from daycare ... and that apparently the letter was mandated by law and 52 children have died this year in similar instances nationwide this year...
Doesn’t even mention if anyone was disciplined or fired...

WTF...
Like what am I supposed to do with this information except be even more of a nervous wreck?
The fact that it’s a state requirement they sent the letter concerns me that other daycares are not any better...
That is my nightmare.
 

RDreamer

Member
Oct 25, 2017
7,732
That feel when you have to hide your child’s book just so you can get a respite from the mind numbing boredom of reading “Where is my cat?” over and over and over for a bit.
 

skeptem

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,303
That feel when you have to hide your child’s book just so you can get a respite from the mind numbing boredom of reading “Where is my cat?” over and over and over for a bit.
Tell me about it. For a while there I was re-reading the same Berenstain bears book (New Baby) over and over and over.

We had this issue for a while and the solution we had with my then 2 year old was encouraging her with "What new book are we going to read tonight?" and then if she was really determined to re-read the same book for the hundredth time, we would tell her it was someone else turn to pick a book.
 

RDreamer

Member
Oct 25, 2017
7,732
Like I don't even care about reading a book day to day or if it's fun a bunch of times in a day. But now my 14 month old has this habit of wanting the same book read upwards of 8 times in a row. Most books I'm fine with that. I get into it. They're fun and have a flow. Some, though, are just insanity bait. "Where is my cat?" "This is not my cat." over and over and over and over. I add in some things, but good god tiny man!

We have this cute "Everywhere Babies" book that's fun to read even over and over, for example.
 

The Albatross

Member
Oct 25, 2017
10,283
Like I don't even care about reading a book day to day or if it's fun a bunch of times in a day. But now my 14 month old has this habit of wanting the same book read upwards of 8 times in a row. Most books I'm fine with that. I get into it. They're fun and have a flow. Some, though, are just insanity bait. "Where is my cat?" "This is not my cat." over and over and over and over. I add in some things, but good god tiny man!

We have this cute "Everywhere Babies" book that's fun to read even over and over, for example.
lol this is my life.

My 15 month old goes between the same 6-8 books, it's normal, kids like the repetition of expected things... Although so often I wish she'd just want to bang on her toys or play with the noise making ones, instead of constantly asking me to read books ...w hich hey I should be happy, she *LOVES* books and loves flipping through them, but godddddam if I have to read "The Story of Rock" again (an insufferably terrible rhyming book about a people's history of rock and roll)... Well... I'll do it, but I don't be happy about it.

Books I hide from my daughter:
  • Pajama Time
  • Perfect Piggies
  • Any other horrible Susan Boynton book. I honestly don't know how a publishing company has the gaul to print these they're *SO* bad ("Perfect Piggies: A STORY, a SONG, a SENSATION!" -- it is none of these things, it is an insufferably stupid book that doesn't make ANY sense, even in the non-sensical world of children's books).
  • The Story of Rock (brain dead book about rock and roll history which has cringe inducing rhyming lines about Weezer, the White Stripes, and a bunch of shit)
  • I love you stinky face (I think that's the title, I like this one, it's clever)
I think a lot of the classics are still really good... Dr. Seusse book of ABCs seems bad at first, but now I really like it. Fucking Peter Peppers Puppy and now PAPAs in the pail. I didn't see that coming at all. And fucking J J Jerry's Jelly Jar and Jam begin that way, Jerry is high as a fucking kite on that page.

There's a handful of children's books that I love:
  • The Berenstain Bears and the Spooky Old Tree
  • Llama Llama Red Pajama (I think this is a good book, although, as a father, I can't help but notice that Baby Llama has no Papa Llama in the picture...)
  • King Baby
  • Steam Train, Dream Train (really good one)
  • You Were the First (excellent early year baby book for new parents, if you don't cry the first few times you read it with your child you don't have a soul)
  • Where Does Pig Live (A Barnyard Search and FInd book!). Help pig find his house, twists and turns on every flap.
  • Love, Mama (A delightful story about a penguin Kipling and his mother traveling for work, got it for my wife when she was going away for a weekend, made her cry)
  • Giraffes Can't Dance
There's not a ton of books for fathers and daughters that aren't weird or bizarre or too "Daddys little girl" stuff. I like "Made for Me," that's cute, and "I Love My Daddy" board book... "I Love My Daddy" is a little brain dead, but it's cute and the drawings are nice.

There's a lot that I read regularly that I tolerate but don't love:
  • Juno Valentine and the Magical Shoes: Meh. I feel like it's missing pages. The jump from Juno noticing that there's a twinkling in the corner of her closet to becoming Cleopatra is very sudden. Also, I'm tired of Frida Kahlo being in every fucking book for little girls. I do like that it has Serena WIlliams.
  • What Color is a Kiss. It's pretty good. The illustrations are great and evocative. I'm just not into the story, and I struggle with the big reveal of what color a kiss is.
 
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RDreamer

Member
Oct 25, 2017
7,732
My 15 month old goes between the same 6-8 books, it's normal, kids like the repetition of expected things... Although so often I wish she'd just want to bang on her toys or play with the noise making ones, instead of constantly asking me to read books ...w hich hey I should be happy, she *LOVES* books and loves flipping through them, but godddddam if I have to read "The Story of Rock" again (an insufferably terrible rhyming book about a people's history of rock and roll)... Well... I'll do it, but I don't be happy about it.
Yeah I definitely caught on that he likes things that are expected. He used to adore the hungry caterpillar until we introduced others and hose just kind of ramped up. Just recently though he's done the crazy streaks of 7 or 8 times in a row. Before it might be twice. And obviously when he was even younger (14 mo now) it was hard getting through just one in full.

He loves books though. We read through probably 30+ every day. Not different ones obviously. We'll clear his entire book arsenal in his room some mornings.

  • Any other horrible Susan Boynton book. I honestly don't know how a publishing company has the gaul to print these they're *SO* bad ("Perfect Piggies: A STORY, a SONG, a SENSATION!" -- it is none of these things, it is an insufferably stupid book that doesn't make ANY sense, even in the non-sensical world of children's books).
Haha, I actually like a few of those. There's some bad ones at the library, but honestly the ones we have are pretty fun to play out, but maybe t hat's because I'm a goofy bastard.
 

The Albatross

Member
Oct 25, 2017
10,283
I like Eric Carle... The Very Hungry Catepillar and Brown Bear, Brown Bear. My wife hates those books, but I like them both. I recently bought "Baby Bear, What do you see?" which I'm sure will trigger my wife, but I'm all in on the simplicity of it.

PURPLE CAT PURPLE CAT WHAT DO YOU SEE

We have a bunch of books I inherited from my parents childrens book library, so a ton of Richard Scary illustrated books, and most of them are like really spartan books... Like books you'd enjoy during the Great Depression because it was either "Pat the Bunny" or gruel for dinner so you'd choose "Pat the Bunny."

There's this one book ... "I Am a BUnny," which has a very simple story... "I am a bunny..." and then Nicholas the bunny kinda just tells you what he does, which is a lot of standing around. But goddam the illustrations are great and really well done for such a simple book, and turns out it was illustrated by Richard Scary, which makes a lot of sense.







I just look at this and I'm like "who thought of this."

I like these old books because I think they're reflective of a time when the old thing children had to do was sit around and watch birds, stay out of the rain, and watch toads jumping in the pond. Today, kids have virtual reality stimulation helmets.
 

CrudeDiatribe

Member
Oct 25, 2017
946
Eastern Canada
Any other horrible Susan Boynton book.
Really enjoyed the first several Boynton books we got— they had good rhythm and were fun and entertaining. Then we got one about dinosaurs that had a lot more words on the page— I think it's supposed to read like poetry but it just loses it's own meter and it's very difficult to read. I now read books in stores and haven't found any more of her books that were as joyous as the first ones we got.
 

RDreamer

Member
Oct 25, 2017
7,732
Really enjoyed the first several Boynton books we got— they had good rhythm and were fun and entertaining. Then we got one about dinosaurs that had a lot more words on the page— I think it's supposed to read like poetry but it just loses it's own meter and it's very difficult to read. I now read books in stores and haven't found any more of her books that were as joyous as the first ones we got.
The Dinosaur Dance? We love that one in our household. It's one of our 14 month old's current favorites.
 

Dr_LawyerCop

Member
Oct 25, 2017
284
We like the Boyton books we have, dinosaur dance, the going to bed book, and spooky pookie. They’re fun to read but I’ve definitely picked up a few of hers that weren’t good while looking at target/the library.

Just got confirmation that my 17 month old has hand, foot, and mouth disease. He seemed a little off this weekend but we thought it was teething. Then we found out a kid in his daycare has it and started putting two and two together. I’ve been starting to get sick with what I assumed was a cold so now I’m just praying I don’t have it. Going to be a fun week.
 

Anno

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,687
Columbus, Ohio
The Going to Bed Book has been a staple in the house for awhile.

About 8 months ago we subscribed to whatever the infant version of Highlights is called and she loves those things. Whenever a new one arrives that’s all she wants to read for days.
 

RDreamer

Member
Oct 25, 2017
7,732
I’m fairly certain if I said my son’s sleeping was trash, especially lately, it would be an insult to trash. I would love trash sleeping again. This sucks and I never imagined this shit.
 

The Albatross

Member
Oct 25, 2017
10,283
RDreamer how old is your son again like 14, 15 mos?

I started sleep training with my 15mos daughter just over 2 weeks ago. After 3-4months of sleep regression where her sleeping through the night was a rarity, within about 3 or 4 nights, she slept through the night once, then consistently waking only for a short while, and now, we've had 4 consecutive nights of uninterrupted sleep... ~7pm - 630am or so.

I detailed some of this on page 37 (50posts per page).

Our biggest problem was we reinforced bad habits by taking her into our bed or taking her out of her crib to try to get her back to sleep. And I got firm on it, and bsically did all of the sleep training myself (my wife is a very deep sleeper). I did a sort of mix of the 'elimination' method. Baby wakes up, cries, I'd go in after a few mins of sustained crying/protest, calm her down but wouldn't take her out of her crib, lay her down and rub her back for a bit, maybe 2, 3 minutes or longer earlier on. I'd then sneak out of the room either while she wass "sleeping" (laying down quiet) or if she was still fussy I'd just leave the room. I'd let her cry for 10mins (set a timer on my phone), then go back, do the same, maybe stick around a *little* longer this 2nd time, an then if she was still fussing, I'd leave the room and set a timer for 20mins. If she continued to cry, I'd go in and repeat this again and then set a timer for 30mins. If she's *still* crying after that full hour+, I'd then take her out of the crib and into our bed where she'd normally be so exhausted she'd fall asleep pretty quickly.

After a few days her sleep changed... she started falling back asleep that 2nd time I Went in, or a couple times she woke up and put herself back to sleep within a few minutes. She started sleeping throigh the night on consecutive days something she hadn't done sicne she was maybe... 12 or 13 months old. And, now, a little over 2 weeks after starting this, she's consistently sleeping through the night multiple nights in a row. It's been a big change.

I also got strict with naps on the weekend. Nap at ~11 or 1130, and then another one at 2:30 or 3. I'm kinda the sleep disciplinarian in our house, and so I've taken to calling myself Dr. Sleep. Which... I think strikes enough fear into everybody's heart.
 

RDreamer

Member
Oct 25, 2017
7,732
The Albatross Sleep training is a no for my wife so we’re stuck until he grows out of it naturally. He’s 15 months next week. From what I’ve seen and read this is natural for a child still breastfeeding in the night and she isn’t planning on forcefully weaning him.

I’m mostly venting. 4-5 hours of sleep for so long sucks. But it sucks more seeing my wife so tired from it all too.

He’s getting in teeth and possibly having a growth spurt now because he’s been ravenous so that’s contributing.

I’m not totally against some methods but I think he’s too old for some gentler ones now. I cannot fathom leaving my child to cry for more than a few minutes. An hour is astounding to me.
 

Chopchop

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,423
The Albatross Sleep training is a no for my wife so we’re stuck until he grows out of it naturally. He’s 15 months next week. From what I’ve seen and read this is natural for a child still breastfeeding in the night and she isn’t planning on forcefully weaning him.

I’m mostly venting. 4-5 hours of sleep for so long sucks. But it sucks more seeing my wife so tired from it all too.

He’s getting in teeth and possibly having a growth spurt now because he’s been ravenous so that’s contributing.

I’m not totally against some methods but I think he’s too old for some gentler ones now. I cannot fathom leaving my child to cry for more than a few minutes. An hour is astounding to me.
I know I've plugged this site before, but the author here really did save my sanity when it came to feeding issues about a year ago. Maybe her articles about sleep may help?