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NYT: With Medical Bills Skyrocketing, More Hospitals Are Suing for Payment

Razgriz417

Member
Oct 25, 2017
3,340
I'm honestly terrified of when I turn 26 because I have a shitton of medical issues and I'm relying on my mom's insurance right now because it's much better than anything I can get at the moment.
you'll have to hope your employer has good plans as its getting more and more expensive for them to keep non High Deductible plans around. And the more expensive, out of network claims a company gets, the higher next year's premiums will be for them when they renew the following year.
 

Zombegoast

Member
Oct 30, 2017
4,833
I have over 3k for 8 stitches and 1k for a doctor I never asked for from Orlando Health.

All they've done is threaten me by putting me to a collection agency while avoiding my calls for financial assistant.

The people who have decent insurance provided by their work place and rich people are the most resistant to universal health care. The probably dont care that poor people are getting sure because they can't pay their medical bills.
Uh even with the best insurance, people still can't afford going to the hospital.

Bills can go over $1 million in medical bills
 

Psychoward

Member
Nov 7, 2017
19,891
you'll have to hope your employer has good plans as its getting more and more expensive for them to keep non High Deductible plans around. And the more expensive, out of network claims a company gets, the higher next year's premiums will be for them when they renew the following year.
Yeah I know :/

And what if I'm just working part time while I'm in law school or getting my master's? Screwed I guess
 

mandiller

Member
Oct 27, 2017
212
Brisbane, Australia
Here in Australia I pay 2% of my income in taxes to fund Medicare. With Medicare I don’t pay anything for doctor’s visits or in public hospitals for most treatments and operations. I’m in my 30s, had several operations, and the only time I’ve had a medical bill is when I went to a private hospital one time (on my parents’ insurance which didn’t cover everything, because of course it didn’t).
 
Oct 25, 2017
7,217
Yeah I know :/

And what if I'm just working part time while I'm in law school or getting my master's? Screwed I guess
Depending on where you live and how much you make you can get medicaid. In Washington state it's like a 5 minute process over the phone and they backdate it so you can use it right away after you get approved over the phone.
 

Sho_Nuff82

Member
Nov 14, 2017
6,929
BuT YoU Can KeEp YoUr Plan

All private health insurance is just varying levels of bullshit waiting to gouge your eyes out at the smallest gap in coverage. It's Russian roulette even when you have a "good" plan.
 

devilhawk

Member
Oct 27, 2017
646
There needs to be more societal pressure on the hospitals. People commonly go after the Pharm companies and insurers, but the hospitals themselves are part of the insane increase in costs. Every hospital has hired dozens and dozens of "administrators" that make as much as a primary care physician and who's job has no bearing on patient outcomes.
 

powersurge

Member
Nov 2, 2017
357
Pensacola, FL
I just finished helping my mother with her 2020 benefit selections (she's not very tech savvy and their website was busted) and as someone who works full time as a shift supervisor at a retail store her medical insurance (dental and vision not included) costs $140 a month and has a $7200 deductible (won't cover anything till then) so its pretty much worthless to her and since she's full time and can get her employers "plan" she doesn't qualify for a better subsidized ACA plan.

She had a muscle spasm in her arm (pulled it at work lifting stuff that's not normally part of her daily job) so she went to Urgent Care on her day off. $40 out of pocket to see the Doctor who couldn't tell her what was wrong or do anything for it so he sent her to the Emergency room for a MRI in case she had a stroke (it was obvious it was a pulled muscle) which was clear and the Emergency room doctor gave her muscle relaxers. Slapped her with something around $5k emergency room and MRI bills. She managed to complain and have the costs reduced and some of it the hospital absorbed but the whole thing was pure insanity. Parallel to that she had to fight for a few weeks to get her work to cover the rest since it was a pulled muscle that happened at work.

So yeah if you get sick or hurt in Murica either your employers crap insurance plan will ruin you or the hospitals themselves will. :(

Shit like this is why family will find me dead in my apartment if I ever get too sick
Can confirm no insurance here and was denied medicaid (Yay Florida).
 
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Xx 720

Member
Nov 3, 2017
2,401
Yeah I know :/

And what if I'm just working part time while I'm in law school or getting my master's? Screwed I guess
One thing, if you ever have a medical emergency and it’s not life threatening - like needing stitches or flu symptoms etc. don’t ever go to the emergency room, go to an urgent care center (“doc in a box”), most insurance covers with a flat rate as opposed to meeting a high deductible, will save you a fortune.
 

Psychoward

Member
Nov 7, 2017
19,891
One thing, if you ever have a medical emergency and it’s not life threatening - like needing stitches or flu symptoms etc. don’t ever go to the emergency room, go to an urgent care center (“doc in a box”), most insurance covers with a flat rate as opposed to meeting a high deductible, will save you a fortune.
Oh I know, I already go to urgent care a decent amount already.

But like a lot of my medical expenses comes from medication and surgeries that need to be done so I cant avoid it
 

Aaronology

Member
Oct 27, 2017
533
Chicago
A cashier at a Providence Health hospital in Oregon reported having wages garnished for outstanding medical debt to her own employer. For one paycheck for 80 hours of work, she took home 54 cents after a garnishment and other deductions.
Yeah I don't think I can handle this thread. We've practically returned to indentured servitude.
 

ArkhamFantasy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
7,090
There needs to be more societal pressure on the hospitals. People commonly go after the Pharm companies and insurers, but the hospitals themselves are part of the insane increase in costs. Every hospital has hired dozens and dozens of "administrators" that make as much as a primary care physician and who's job has no bearing on patient outcomes.
The pricing is a feature, not a bug. White people don't want a health care system that brown people can afford, they'd rather be broke and sick than see their tax dollars go to help them.
 
Oct 25, 2017
2,949
Racoon City
This is terrible, but keep in mind universal health care itself has to be paid for - we definitely need it - but I worry people think that medical bills will magically disappear, of course they won’t. When you go to a hospital now you are paying your bill plus A part of the bills of all the people who never pay anything. It won’t be any different under universal health care except you will pay out of your paycheck.
You guys do know you pay three times in the US right?

Once in federal taxes - Hospitals bill the federal government for many uninsured and at ridiculous rates
FICA - Goes towards medicare
Then your health insurance plan

Two of the three are billed at hilariously fucked up rates

The pricing is a feature, not a bug. White people don't want a health care system that brown people can afford, they'd rather be broke and sick than see their tax dollars go to help them.
Yup, funny thing is in the early 1900s, America was toying with the idea of an NHS system but realized black people would benefit so were like nah.
 

XMonkey

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,613
Just a total garbage system, not much else to say at this point. Patching it with a public option isn’t going to work either.
 

Dekim

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,004
It seems too many people would rather deal with what they perceive as a far-in-the-future-high-medical-bill that may or may not happen rather than pay a little extra in taxes now so that future, massive medical bill will not happen to them and they will get the care they need. People would rather have the higher income now than to cover their bases in the future.
 

Lant_War

The Fallen
Jul 14, 2018
10,783
This is terrible, but keep in mind universal health care itself has to be paid for - we definitely need it - but I worry people think that medical bills will magically disappear, of course they won’t. When you go to a hospital now you are paying your bill plus A part of the bills of all the people who never pay anything. It won’t be any different under universal health care except you will pay out of your paycheck.
Yeah it won't make you bankrupt if you catch a cold.
 

XMonkey

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,613
It seems too many people would rather deal with what they perceive as a far-in-the-future-high-medical-bill that may or may not happen rather than pay a little extra in taxes now so that future, massive medical bill will not happen to them and they will get the care they need. People would rather have the higher income now than to cover their bases in the future.
I mean, people in these situations still do have insurance and they’re still screwed over by giant co-pays and insane deductibles, so I don’t think that logic is really working out in practice.
 

BobLoblaw

This Guy Helps
Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,485
When the fuck are we gonna crack down on hospitals and their scam practice or overinflating costs? I keep seeing all these plans about Medicare for All plans, but that shit will bankrupt the entire country unless we reign in how much hospitals and pharmaceutical companies are allowed to charge.
 

Baji Boxer

Member
Oct 27, 2017
5,874
Several years ago I sprained my knee at work and was given one of these:



Urgent care sent me a bill charging me $400 for it.
 

ArkhamFantasy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
7,090
Several years ago I sprained my knee at work and was given one of these:



Urgent care sent me a bill charging me $400 for it.
I had a fairly minor pain in my groin while doing barbell squats, not a big deal, but i wanted to talk to a physical therapist just to identify which muscle was the issue and how to prevent it. My insurance wouldn't let me go to the physical therapist without first going to the doctor, so i had to pay $100 for a doctors visit, he made me get x rays, that was another $400, THEN i was allowed to TALK to a physical therapist.

$500 to get permission to talk to a physical therapist. TO TALK TO ONE.
 

Mivey

Member
Oct 25, 2017
6,914
This is terrible, but keep in mind universal health care itself has to be paid for - we definitely need it - but I worry people think that medical bills will magically disappear, of course they won’t. When you go to a hospital now you are paying your bill plus A part of the bills of all the people who never pay anything. It won’t be any different under universal health care except you will pay out of your paycheck.
It's not a zero sum game, the way it's set up in the US right now, with a focus on private insures and maximizing profits and returns, leads to an explosion in cost, not observed in countries with mostly public insurance (you usually allow private insurances, but since they don't really compete with the state owned insurance, all they can do is offer side services).
And this increase in cost isn't a bug, it's a feature.
 

Castamere

Member
Oct 26, 2017
888
Even good work insurance doesn't completely protect you. A coworker on our insurance just had major surgery and it still cost her 3k out of pocket, and we have really good insurance.
 

Paz

Member
Nov 1, 2017
1,337
Brisbane, Australia
I can’t believe the discussion around universal healthcare in the USA is still stuck at the “how do we pay for it” / “it still costs money” stage even In a place like era.
 

ArkhamFantasy

Member
Oct 25, 2017
7,090
I can’t believe the discussion around universal healthcare in the USA is still stuck at the “how do we pay for it” / “it still costs money” stage even In a place like era.
Those are bad faith arguments. The real answer is "I'm happy with my insurance, i don't care if other people are struggling" or "I'm happy that it's expensive because brown people can't afford it".
 

Darksol

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,104
Japan
I’m now living in America and am on the best form of Obamacare as of Jan 1st, and this is still shit tier compared to Canada (which is in itself, shit tier, compared to many other countries).

I don’t know how or why people live here. Thankfully I’m out of this country in a few years, on to another progressive nation.
 
Oct 25, 2017
4,002
I’m now living in America and am on the best form of Obamacare as of Jan 1st, and this is still shit tier compared to Canada (which is in itself, shit tier, compared to many other countries).

I don’t know how or why people live here. Thankfully I’m out of this country in a few years, on to another progressive nation.
A lot of us are stuck here. We know this country is a lost cause.
 

Stiler

Avenger
Oct 29, 2017
6,652
This is terrible, but keep in mind universal health care itself has to be paid for - we definitely need it - but I worry people think that medical bills will magically disappear, of course they won’t. When you go to a hospital now you are paying your bill plus A part of the bills of all the people who never pay anything. It won’t be any different under universal health care except you will pay out of your paycheck.

Two major differences, first off the government usually caps the cost of things in universal healthcare, so that hospitals/insurance can't charge waaaaaaay over the cost to make a "profit."

Two, everyone chips in based on their income, so someone who is already poor/struggling isn't having to kick in as much as a person who's super well off. As well since EVERYONE chips in and not just those that pay insurance/go to the hospital, this gives even more of a safety net.

Of course these things piss off the for profit corporations and big pharma.
 

Cas

Avenger
Oct 27, 2017
3,640
I'm not sure how anyone is truly happy with their insurance through their employer in the US. From what I see through my husband's employer (and it's a top 100 company in the US), you either take a catastrophic $6k+ (12k for family, lol) deductible insurance for a reasonable premium amount every month or end up paying some ridiculously high scaling premiums on "Gold" and "Silver" plans that STILL have over 1k+ deductibles and the same 20% co-insurance expectations!

My family ends up always taking the "Bronze" catastrophic plan because it's just the cheapest and we're lucky not to have any major health issues, so we save what we don't pay in the higher premiums in a separate account just in case we have to pay that ridiculous deductible one day. But it feels like such a freaking waste since we're paying almost $5k a year in premiums (and keep in mind that's what we're paying after it was already subsidized by the employer, so his work is paying maybe another 7-9k more to the insurance on top of that!) to only get fully covered once a year for a gynecologist visit, once a year well-child checkups, and our dental insurance. Everything else we pay out of pocket because it's never enough to justify any of the higher premiums. The whole system is a fucking scheme, with the insurance providers being the biggest scammers out there.

I would love to instead pay a flat percentage to a single payer, universal coverage system. Or heck, turn our current employer coverage into medicare for all instead. It's got to be better than the crap we have.
 
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gozu

Member
Oct 27, 2017
3,283
America
I just got a bill for $2000 for a 11 month old MRI that a hospital forgot to submit to my insurance.

Fuck co-pays, fuck deductibles and fuck the health insurance industry. The assholes have caused me to miss several PT sessions because they'll only approve 3 at a time. Why? Greed. Just pure fucking greed. As if anybody would suffer through PT needlessly.

They do EVERYTHING to make sure I receive the worst possible care to save a buck, basically.

And this is just in the past 2 weeks. I have many more tales of infuriating woes.
 

Andington

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,618
Fucking vultures. Now that is effectively a class war on the poor. Fuck them, and fuck anyone who defends this barbaric system. I don't care what any argument is for a for-profit healthcare system. Vote Bernie Sanders to end this madness.
 

KtotheRoc

Member
Oct 27, 2017
22,002
Absolutely disgusting. It's insane how bad America's healthcare system is, and how much worse so many seem to actually want it to be.
 

BitsandBytes

Member
Dec 16, 2017
3,010
I just got a bill for $2000 for a 11 month old MRI that a hospital forgot to submit to my insurance.
I think reading stuff like this is more painful than the issue I had nearly 3 years ago that involved 2x MRI, ~30 X-Rays, 2xER visits/ambulance rides, a fairly big operation and a total of 2.5 weeks stay in hospital among a long list of other things that in the US would be charged for on top of high insurance/co-pays/excesses.
 

Christo750

Member
May 10, 2018
1,733
You can cure the insurance problem all you want but that won’t stop hospitals and doctors from price-gauging people. It’s literally the only reason I have fear that MFA isn’t sustainable. They’re just going to try to gauge the government rather than us and insurers. I haven’t really heard solutions to this problem with all the health care talk.
 

Version 3.0

Member
Oct 27, 2017
2,521
The people who have decent insurance provided by their work place and rich people are the most resistant to universal health care. The probably dont care that poor people are getting sure because they can't pay their medical bills.
I have what's considered decent health insurance from my job, so even that doesn't pay nearly all the bills, were I to get sick. Going to the doctor is still quite expensive in many cases. I don't understand at all how other people in my situation wouldn't rather have the demonstrably better systems that exist in other countries.

As for the rich, well, they seem to see unfairness everywhere. A few years back, our insurance plans changed, and we all had to go to meetings to hear the new details. When pricing was explained to be tiered (3 tiers), a mid-level executive in our meeting asked "you mean to tell me that just because I make more money, I'll be paying more for the same coverage?". To which the instructor replied "I'm sure anyone in this room would be happy to exchange their salary and price with yours". That got a few laughs and a fair bit of murmuring as well.

Seeing that the room was not with him, the executive shut up. But you could just tell he was fuming over paying what I recall to be about $40 more, monthly, for him than the lowest-paid employees would be paying.
 

XMonkey

Member
Oct 26, 2017
2,613
You can cure the insurance problem all you want but that won’t stop hospitals and doctors from price-gauging people. It’s literally the only reason I have fear that MFA isn’t sustainable. They’re just going to try to gauge the government rather than us and insurers. I haven’t really heard solutions to this problem with all the health care talk.
In a single payer system the government doesn’t have to just pay what a hospital asks for. The government is the one doling out the money, they have enormous leverage in controlling costs in this situation and would set price caps on things.
 

Christo750

Member
May 10, 2018
1,733
In a single payer system the government doesn’t have to just pay what a hospital asks for. The government is the one doling out the money, they have enormous leverage in controlling costs in this situation and would set price caps on things.
And you expect that to work the same way in America?
 

feline fury

Member
Dec 8, 2017
498
A so called "free market" is what caused our country to pay twice as much as SOCIALIZED HEALTHCARE countries do. Again I'll bring up that I doubt the average person knows how much the "employee contribution" is to their monthly premium.
I thought the ACA requires the disclosure of the these contributions to the employee? I see mine on my paystub each pay period.