Intel Xe GPU Discrete graphics card rumor: Progress not going well. Lower Efficiency than Competitors

Hace

Member
Sep 21, 2018
680
man intel has really gone downhill over the last decade, what the hell happened.

at least they still have the best IPC and...... pretty good budged SSDs?
 

jett

Community Resettler
Member
Oct 25, 2017
21,540
Another Larrabee huh. Intel just can't hack it lately.
 

ILikeFeet

Member
Oct 25, 2017
28,438
Yup. And Larrabee was meant to be capable of some form of raytracing (not that Project Offset used that though).
really curious as to how that was to work. Imagination has been experimenting with RT in their mobile chips several years ago, so possibly someone like Intel might have been able to do something similar with Larabee
 

s_mirage

Member
Oct 25, 2017
1,308
Birmingham, UK
man intel has really gone downhill over the last decade, what the hell happened.

at least they still have the best IPC and...... pretty good budged SSDs?
Possible complacency on the CPU side, and even the best IPC question isn't too clear cut these days. Zen 2 seems to trade with Intel clock for clock depending on software tested.

As for discrete graphics cards, poor execution isn't exactly a new thing for Intel. This will be at least the third time they have tried to break into the market. They tried with the i740 in the '90s, which proved to be a bit of a mistake and tanked, and more recently they tried again with Larrabee. Larrabee was cancelled before making it to market.
 

Soundchaser

Member
Oct 25, 2017
864
really curious as to how that was to work. Imagination has been experimenting with RT in their mobile chips several years ago, so possibly someone like Intel might have been able to do something similar with Larabee
Larrabee was supposed to be a pile of souped-up Pentium 1 cores (P54C) running FreeBSD with a video output. Their RT implementation would have to be a pure software renderer, without any special HW sauce like Nvidia's RT cores or PowerVR's RTUs. The only dedicated graphics hardware was the texture units. And yes, you could literally telnet into your GPU, run "ps -aux" to see every process that runs on it, and even install your own graphics API implementation. Larrabee was the first GPU to support DirectX 12 thanks to its total programmability.

Also, the architect of Larrabee wrote this in 2008:
I've been trying to keep quiet, but I need to get one thing very clear. Larrabee is going to render DirectX and OpenGL games through rasterisation, not through raytracing.

I'm not sure how the message got so muddled. I think in our quest to just keep our heads down and get on with it, we've possibly been a bit too quiet. So some comments about exciting new rendering tech got misinterpreted as our one and only plan. Larrabee's tech enables many fascinating possibilities, and we're excited by all of them. But this current confusion has got a lot of developers worried about us breaking their games and forcing them to change the way they do things. That's not the case, and I apologise for any panic.

There's only one way to render the huge range of DirectX and OpenGL games out there, and that's the way they were designed to run - the conventional rasterisation pipeline. That has been the goal for the Larrabee team from day one, and it continues to be the primary focus of the hardware and software teams. We take triangles, we rasterise them, we do Z tests, we do pixel shading, we write to a framebuffer. There's plenty of room within that pipeline for innovation to last us for many years to come. It's done very nicely for over a quarter of a century, and there's plenty of life in the old thing yet.

There's no doubt Larrabee is going to be the world's most awesome raytracer. It's going to be the world's most awesome chip at a lot of heavy computing tasks - that's the joy of total programmability combined with serious number-crunching power. But that is cool stuff for those that want to play with wacky tech. We're not assuming everybody in the world will do this, we're not forcing anyone to do so, and we certainly can't just do it behind their backs and expect things to work - that would be absurd. Raytracing on Larrabee is a fascinating research project, it's an exciting new way of thinking about rendering scenes, just like splatting or voxels or any number of neat ideas, but it is absolutely not the focus of Larrabee's primary rendering capabilities, and never has been - not even for a moment.
 
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