IGN's YouTube channel is doing "Devs React to Speedruns" series

Red Devil

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Oct 29, 2017
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IGN has been posting some speedruns on their YouTube channel for some time, but a couple of months ago they started this small series where game developers are invited to provide commentary on their own game's speedrun. It's funny to see them witness their work getting torn apart.




The whole playlist is here. Right now there aren't too many of them, but it seems like they went viral enough to continue the series!
 

Jawmuncher

*Dibo Crisis*
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Oct 25, 2017
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That's actually a cool idea, will give these a watch. As we rarely get feedback from the devs when they see the unique ways people break their games.
 

Fat4all

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Reminds me when AGDQ got a Dev on the phone and they were flabbergasted at some of the things speedrunners figures out

think it was super meat boy
 

Brian Damage

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Nov 1, 2017
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I remember a GDQ speedrun of Double Dragon Neon with one of the Wayforward devs watching along remotely. Some of their reactions to exploits/bugs they'd never seen before were pretty good.
 

Platy

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Oct 25, 2017
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Reminds me when AGDQ got a Dev on the phone and they were flabbergasted at some of the things speedrunners figures out

think it was super meat boy
It always happens at least once per event.
My favorite was The Mask for SNES dude that was mind blown by a skip to the point of loud noises.

edit:

It has a delay in what is happening and what the dev see so it takes a moment for the reaction
 
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Zephyriel

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Oct 27, 2017
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The Youtube algorithrm has been trying to make me watch that Outer Worlds speedrun video for a while even though I haven't watched anything about this game (beyond one trailer) or speedruns in general... So I can see how one could say it got viral.
 

FlintSpace

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Oct 28, 2017
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Yeah watched the control one earlier and is pretty awesome. The devs shares some good insight into game building and level design.
 

nnavidson

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Dec 16, 2017
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The addition of the developers commentary elevates the videos into something I enjoy watching. Speed running is impressive, but normally not something I’d watch all the way through.
 

Chronospherics

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I would imagine that many developers will feel like they've seen this in their QA department. QA have to test specific things in specific levels, so they're very good at doing whatever they can to skip forward through a level.
 

Madao

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Oct 26, 2017
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i wonder how Miyamoto and Aonuma would react to OoT and MM speedruns. these are on a whole new level these days.

I would imagine that many developers will feel like they've seen this in their QA department. QA have to test specific things in specific levels, so they're very good at doing whatever they can to skip forward through a level.
most of the crazy speed run tricks are stuff people in QA missed so i would guess they actually never saw it in QA.
 

Chronospherics

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i wonder how Miyamoto and Aonuma would react to OoT and MM speedruns. these are on a whole new level these days.



most of the crazy speed run tricks are stuff people in QA missed so i would guess they actually never saw it in QA.
Games ship with often 1000s of bugs that are known to the developers. The reason many skips make it in is because the player usually needs to be quite deliberately doing something specific in order to enact them, so when they get put into Jira or whatever, they're marked as low priority. Especially if they don't affect stability.
 

Aswitch

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Nov 27, 2017
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A fantastic idea. It's cool to see devs donate and comment at GDQ, but I did always wonder this. I've avoided majority of those vids since they're games I haven't played, but intend to at some point.

This would be a pretty awesome aspect to add to GDQ actually. Maybe like a donation bonus if a goal is met or something like that depending. Have the couch include some runners and some devs explaining their inital intentions of certain mechanics and glitches would be pretty cool since GDQ is gaining notoriety in general now.
 

Megasoum

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Oct 25, 2017
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Heh... A friend of mine is doing the commentary on that Tomb Raider one... So weird to hear him in an official video like that
 

dragonbane

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Oct 26, 2017
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Games ship with often 1000s of bugs that are known to the developers. The reason many skips make it in is because the player usually needs to be quite deliberately doing something specific in order to enact them, so when they get put into Jira or whatever, they're marked as low priority. Especially if they don't affect stability.
I doubt that holds true for a good chunk of the big Zeldas starting with oot and arbitrary code execution lol
 

Chronospherics

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I doubt that holds true for a good chunk of the big Zeldas starting with oot and arbitrary code execution lol
No doubt for older games that people have spent more time into speed running and discovering strategies.

But with things like Shadow of the Tomb Raider, a game that released recently, that had a tonne (likely hundreds) of QA both internal to Square Enix and external contractors working iteratively for at least a year on the game.

Hence why the guy keeps saying "it's just like watching one of my testers" at the start.

Also, where they might be surprised is when glitches are leading to more glitches and skips, because QA just play to identify the issue, not to see how deep the rabbit hole might go.