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British ERA: why do you sometimes pronounce

Khoryos

Member
Nov 5, 2019
263
I'll happily explain any quirk of British pronounciation I can to anyone that can explain Kansas/Arkansas to my satisfaction.
 

Retroarnold

Member
Nov 5, 2017
2,646
I have never heard anybody in the UK refer to their parents as Mama and Papa and I live in the South where you'd expect to hear it. The only exception is Polish children who call their mothers "Mama". My son included as he is half Polish. Oddly, he doesn't call me "Tata" (Polish word for dad) and just calls me "Dad".
 

Shake Appeal

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,957
My observation on the British thing, as an Irish person, is that most English people will happily call themselves British. So will some (Protestant, conservative) people in Northern Irish, and some (conservative) people in Wales.

Most Welsh people won't, however. No one from Scotland seems to. And more conservative (i.e., nationalist) English people are less likely to do it.
 

Fat4all

Community Resettler
Member
Oct 25, 2017
28,634
bork land
im not British, but the word ‘sommit’ worked its way into my vocabulary at least 15 years ago somehow
 

Geoff

Member
Oct 27, 2017
6,120
My observation on the British thing, as an Irish person, is that most English people will happily call themselves British. So will some (Protestant, conservative) people in Northern Irish, and some (conservative) people in Wales.

Most Welsh people won't, however. No one from Scotland seems to. And more conservative (i.e., nationalist) English people are less likely to do it.
This is probably more or less right.
 

Psychotext

Member
Oct 30, 2017
4,612
Also, why do Americans call us British?

Never heard anyone from the UK use that to describe themselves.

English, Irish, Welsh, Scottish, Europeon... never British.
On this subject... if I'm in the US, would I be better saying I come from the UK or Great Britain?

I appreciate that "England" would have more people know where I'm talking about, but as a Welshman those words will never come out of my mouth.
 

Shake Appeal

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,957
It is called an accent. Many Irish people do it as well.
Well, when this happens with an Irish accent, they render the "th" as a hard "t" ("tree" instead of "three") or even a "d" sound ("dis" and "dat" in Dublin, versus "this" and "that"). This is partly a hangover from the Irish language (what Americans call Gaelic) not having an equivalent sound prior to British colonization. Sadly, like everything else in the U.K. and Ireland, it's heavily bound up in regional and class distinctions. I pronounce my "th," but I also grew up in a middle-class South Dublin family and went to a private school, so I have my own weird linguistic quirks people would find annoying (but I'm not in "roysh" for "right" territory). A linguist in the U.S. once pegged me as Irish because I said "em" instead of "um" when trying to remember something in conversation, which was pretty cool.

Again, though, any linguist would reject the idea that there is any such thing as correct pronunciation.
 

Shake Appeal

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,957
On this subject... if I'm in the US, would I be better saying I come from the UK or Great Britain?
They'll understand either, but they'll assume you're English. Relatively few people will understand that the U.K. is a complex political entity, and most people won't know that Wales is a part of it.

But hey, that's still better than being Irish and being referred to as a "Brit" all the time.
 

Psychotext

Member
Oct 30, 2017
4,612
They'll understand either, but they'll assume you're English. Relatively few people will understand that the U.K. is a complex political entity, and most people won't know that Wales is a part of it.

But hey, that's still better than being Irish and being referred to as a "Brit" all the time.
I usually say I'm from Wales, the country stuck to the side of England.
 

elio

alt account
Banned
Sep 26, 2019
71
Also, why do Americans call us British?

Never heard anyone from the UK use that to describe themselves.

English, Irish, Welsh, Scottish, Europeon... never British.
That's odd to me. I call myself British and I hear it all the time. We are British citizens after all. If I'm talking to someone international it's always British and if I'm talking to someone from the UK I'll say which county I'm from rather than which country.
 

astro

Member
Oct 25, 2017
21,843
Getting loads of replies to this is a bit annoying after the thread was bumped lol.

This is not something I can recall hearing amongst people I personally know... ever. It's really strange hearing people say "me and people I know call ourselves british".

Maybe it's down to geography?

I grew up in Surrey and lived most of my adult life in London.
 
Nov 18, 2017
707
Im welsh and one of my buds cousins has the thickest welsh accent ive ever heard.

she pronounces Mammy as Maaaammmeeeeaaaarrrr. Mamear. Its adorable and pretty funny.