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British ERA: why do you sometimes pronounce

Fevaweva

Member
Oct 30, 2017
2,215
I have never referred to either parent as mama or papa and I have never heard anyone use those terms either.

Always Mum, Dad, Ma, Da, Mam, mother or father Mummy or Daddy (those last two not so much).
 
Jan 1, 2018
73
I've been wondering this too as I have a co-worker from Scotland that always does it.

Also the narrator in Peppa Pig always says "Pepper and George"
 

Brian Damage

Member
Nov 1, 2017
7,176
UK
Also, why do Americans call us British?

Never heard anyone from the UK use that to describe themselves.

English, Irish, Welsh, Scottish, Europeon... never British.
My friends and family have, by and large, referred to ourselves as British over any of those. At least in the case of my family, we've bounced between England and Scotland frequently enough and have various upbringings either side of that border that the distinction is way too cloudy for us to tie ourselves that closely to either.

I'm afraid I can't contribute to the topic at hand since I've never heard anyone use Mama or Papa, intrusive R or no.
 

Geoff

Member
Oct 27, 2017
6,041
Ignorance; and lack of separating Scotland, England, and Wales on the world map depicting the UK.
It's not ignorance. We literally are British like it or not. It's just fallen out of fashion recently. in the 19th century British was much more widespread even in Scotland.

As for the op - referring to ones mother and father as MamAH and PapAH is extremely upper class and possibly archaic at this point. It's the kind of thing that happens on Downton Abbey. We don't really use Mamma or Pappa either though.
 

Geoff

Member
Oct 27, 2017
6,041
Explain "Leicester."
Happily

Lei as in Leir as in King Lear, the possibly apocryphal ancient bythronic British king as related by Geoffrey of Monmouth (he of 'earliest record of King Arthur' fame) and latterly and most famously by Shakespeare. Cester as in chester as in castrum which is Latin for 'fort' or 'camp'.

so Leir Cester = the fort of King Lear
Leir cester -> leicester (pronounced lester) over time

It's easy to see how the pronunciation works if you know the root
 

Geoff

Member
Oct 27, 2017
6,041
Well in watching Downten Abbey, Victoria, Poldark, it seems common.
Just seen this post. LMFAO

Do you think these period dramas in any way represent or even seek to represent modern British life? They are set in the pre-war period (amid the aristocracy no less), the 19th and 18th century respectively. We don't all ride horses as transportation or have live-in staff either, in case you were also wondering about that. We don't even have swords.
 

Geoff

Member
Oct 27, 2017
6,041
I still haven't figured out why Worcester is pronounced "wuuster"
Because when words get said a lot, people get lazy with syllables, at least in England. So the name went from whatever 'Wor' is short for followed by 'cester' meaning camp or fort to Wor-cester to wooster.

Any cester words the pronunciation is likely to be first syllable plus 'ster'
 

Fatoy

Member
Mar 13, 2019
1,411
I've been wondering this too as I have a co-worker from Scotland that always does it.

Also the narrator in Peppa Pig always says "Pepper and George"
This has already been tackled on the first page, but although the Peppa Pig narrator has a semi-posh English accent, what you're talking about is different from the old landed gentry calling their parents mamarrrr and paparrrrr. That was an affectation, whereas inserting an "r" in between two vowel sounds is something common to a lot of English accents.

Next time you're watching Peppa Pig, you'll notice the narrator says "Peppa Pig" with no "r" sound after the first name, but "Peppar and George" because otherwise he'd be flowing an "a" and an "a" sound together, which sounds unnatural in his accent.

"India Office" is also a good way to test whether an accent has these intrusive "r" sounds in. I, for instance, would pronounce India as you'd expect in the sentence "I'm flying to India tomorrow," but I'd pronounce the country name slightly differently if I said "I'm flying to the India Office tomorrow". That would sound more like "Indiar".

EDIT: I forgot to say that I speak French as well, and there are similar principles in play to avoid two clashing vowel sounds. In French you have liaisons, where some words ending in a consonant (like "petit" for small) are normally pronounced with the "t" being silent, unless they're followed by another vowel. So "petit chein" (small dog) would sound like "paytee cheeayn" whereas "petit enfant" (small child) would sound like "payteet onphon".
 
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DBT85

Member
Oct 26, 2017
8,542
Call someone a Geordie in Sunderland and you get your head ripped off 😏. Sunderland dialect is Mackem btw.
Yeah but who goes to Sunderland? i kid i kid.

Honestly had no idea that the accents were different.

If you're American, it's pronounced War-chester
Honestly I was trying to order stuff from the US once and this lady on the Target helpline actually said Warchester. She also completely mangled the rest of my address to levels I did not know possible.
 

astro

Member
Oct 25, 2017
21,760
I've never heard it in person, I guess I shouldn't rely on my anecdotal experience.
 

Necromanti

Member
Oct 25, 2017
2,985
I don’t know why people are focusing so much on the words “mama” and “papa” since that’s not the point. But yes, I’ve heard things like “drawring” and Emma pronounced as “Emmer” if preceding a word beginning with a vowel.
 

Rookhelm

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,001
it's usually only inbetween vowels, so like "your mama is hot" would have an r sound linking the words. another famous example is "champagne supernova (r)in the sky" from oasis. it avoids having two vowel sounds next to each other, which otherwise sounds/feels awkward to the speaker.

it's not a british thing, it's a common feature of non-rhotic accents (ie ones that don't tend to pronounce r sounds), which means yeah it also often happens in many non-rhotic US accents — so boston, the south etc.
wow, I've never heard this explanation before. Makes perfect sense, considering I often hear this phenomenon also with New York and Boston accents too.

Thanks!
 

Rookhelm

Member
Oct 27, 2017
1,001
We all in here asking the wrong questions.

Explain Siobhan
I read a whole post once explaining the pronunciations of names like Siobhan, Niamh (Neev), and Saoirse (Sursha). I don't recall the details from memory, but the explanation made perfect sense when they're broken down into their components.
 

Hollywood Duo

Member
Oct 25, 2017
16,694
Perhaps one of them could prepare drawring for us to explain.
I read a whole post once explaining the pronunciations of names like Siobhan, Niamh (Neev), and Saoirse (Sursha). I don't recall the details from memory, but the explanation made perfect sense when they're broken down into their components.
Well yeah. The mistake is trying to compare it to English. The basis of Irish and English are completely different. You have to evaluate it within its own internal rule structure.
 
OP
OP
Liquidsnake

Liquidsnake

Member
Oct 27, 2017
7,790
Those are period dramas full of posh RP folk, I would estimate a minority of the population speak in that manner.

As a genuine 'Brit' I have met less than 10 people who spoke with an RP accent.
:(

I like it, its sounds elegant.

Just seen this post. LMFAO

Do you think these period dramas in any way represent or even seek to represent modern British life? They are set in the pre-war period (amid the aristocracy no less), the 19th and 18th century respectively. We don't all ride horses as transportation or have live-in staff either, in case you were also wondering about that. We don't even have swords.
I know that (lol. dont't even have swords) I was just wondering if there was a situational rule as to when it is used, or I guess was used.
 
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amanset

Member
Oct 28, 2017
1,027
Also, why do Americans call us British?

Never heard anyone from the UK use that to describe themselves.

English, Irish, Welsh, Scottish, Europeon... never British.
I describe myself as British. Always.

I grew up in England but have a parent from England and a parent from Scotland.